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CIS 555 Domain Analysis

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CIS 555 Domain Analysis

Check and read your week 5 lecture, then give your summary with no more than one page about this lecture.

Chapter 5
Domain Analysis
© 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Topics The three components of problem
solving.
The problem space vs. the solution
space.
Requirements vs. product specifications.
Domains and their boundaries.
Identifying domain concepts for analysis
and modeling.
Domain dictionaries and domain catalog.
Identifying and organizing business rules. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 2 Domain Analysis Domain analysis identifies business
concepts that will be refined into the
building blocks of an analysis model
for the information system. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 3 Domain Analysis and Development © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 4 © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 5 Problems, Solutions, and Methods Solving problems involves not a pair
but a trio of components: problem,
solution as method or process, and
solution as answer. Each one can be
understood only in relation to the
whole. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 6 © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 7 Problems, Solutions, and
Requirements To build a software system — a
product — we must understand the
problem. We must also understand
what is required to solve the problem
before we can decide how to solve it. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 8 Problems, Solutions, and Methods Three components of problem solving: the
problem that we want to solve, the answer to the
problem, and the method to arrive at the answer. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 9 Context, Method, and Solution Merely knowing the features of the
solution is inadequate for building it
correctly. We must understand the context to: find the proper method(s), and
design a solution that takes the context into
account. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 10 © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 11 Problem Space Versus Solution Space The three components of problem
solving reside in two organically
related spaces: the problem space
and the solution space. Changing an
element within one space has a ripple
effect across both. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 12 Problem Space Problem space is the context from
which the problem arises and in which
the solution must operate. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 13 Solution Space Solution space defines the territory in
which concrete decisions about the
information system — as opposed to
its features — are made. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 14 © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 15 Requirements Versus Product
Specifications Requirements specify the desired
features of the product or service. Product specifications define the
product that must realize those
features. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 16 Products Are Solutions to Real or
Perceived Problems
Product Requirements Hammer Drive in a nail and pull out a
nail. Watch Tell time and attach to wrist. Telephone Enable people to talk to others
across vast distances in real
time. Movie Entertain with sound, music
and moving pictures. Plane To fly people from location
to location. Rocket To carry people into space. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 17 Products and Requirements Sometimes more than one product or
service can satisfy a requirement. The
choice depends on many factors. The
covered wagon was one of the few
choices before railroads. Though still
a choice, we doubt that it will be
used. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 18 © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 19 Domain Definition A business domain is an area of
related activities that operate on a set
of shared rules and concepts: Business domains are organized domains.
Business domains are goal-oriented.
Business domains can change fast. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5- 20 The Domain Scope Domain scope defi